You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means.

Jared Taylor unequivocally condemns Roof while equivocating

 

The Council of Conservative Citizens is a group that has long been tied to prominent Republican politicians in the American South and counts opposition to “all efforts to mix the races of mankind” among its stated principles. A spokesman for the group condemned the Charleston shooting while suggesting that the suspected gunman’s motives were still legitimate.

“The C of CC unequivocally condemns [Dylann] Roof’s murderous actions,” the spokesman, Jared Taylor (pictured), said in the statement posted on the group’s website. “However, the council stands unshakably behind the facts on its website, and points out the dangers of denying the extent of black-on-white crime.”

Who is Jared Taylor?  The modern face of eugenics & “scientific racism”

 

Taylor entered the active racist scene in 1990, when he founded the New Century Foundation, a pseudo-intellectual think tank that promotes “research” arguing for white superiority. A year later, he began publishing American Renaissance, a magazine that focuses on the alleged links between race and intelligence, and on eugenics, the now discredited “science” of breeding better humans.

“Never in the history of the world has a dominant people thrown open the gates to strangers, and poured its wealth out to aliens,” Taylor wrote in his magazine, under the pseudonym Thomas Jackson, in 1991. “All healthy people prefer the company of their own kind.” Blacks, Taylor writes, are “crime-prone,” “dissipated,” “pathological” and “deviant.”

Taylor, whose 1992 Paved With Good Intentions: The Failure of Race Relations in Contemporary America makes similar points in a book format, went further out on the racist limb in 1993 by speaking at a conference of the Council of Conservative Citizens, a white supremacist group that has described black people as “a retrograde species of humanity.” Today, Taylor’s New Century Foundation is intimately related to the council through “common membership, governing bodies, trustees and officers,” according to the foundation’s tax forms.

In the late 1990s, Taylor came out with The Color of Crime, a booklet that tried to use crime statistics to “prove” that blacks are far more criminally prone than whites — and that argued, based on a misunderstanding of what constitutes a hate crime, that black “hate crimes” against whites exponentially outnumbered the reverse. That racist booklet is now a staple in white supremacist circles. Taylor’s New Century Foundation also plays host to biannual American Renaissance Conferences, suit-and-tie affairs that attract a broad spectrum of the participants from the racist right, including neo-Nazis, white supremacists, Holocaust deniers and eugenicists. The conferences nearly always have an international presence. Speakers have included such prominent figures in the European radical right as Nick Griffin, leader of the racist British National Party, and Bruno Gollnisch, the then second-in-command of Jean Marie Le Pen’s immigrant-bashing French National Front.

More recently, Taylor has sounded off against all black culture, railing in a 2005 article in American Renaissance, “Africa in our Midst: Lessons from Katrina” that “the barbaric behavior” of the city’s black population after the hurricane revealed a key truth: “Blacks and whites are different. When blacks are left entirely to their own devices, Western civilization —any kind of civilization — disappears.”

One thing that separates Taylor from much of the radical right, however, is his lack of anti-Semitism; he told MSNBC-TV interviewer Phil Donahue in 2003 that Jews “are fine by me” and “look white to me.” Taking this position, however, has proven problematic for Taylor. Although he once banned discussion of the so-called “Jewish question” from American Renaissance venues and, in 1997, kicked Holocaust deniers and neo-Nazis off his E-mail list, Taylor also continued to allow people like Don Black, the former Klan leader who runs the neo-Nazi Stormfront.org web forum, and Jamie Kelso, a Stormfront moderator, to attend his biannual American Renaissance conferences. The problem for Taylor is that many of the most active participants at his conferences and the most committed members of the American radical right are passionately anti-Semitic. To ban them for their anti-Semitic views would be a devastating blow to Taylor’s efforts to make his journal and conferences the flagship institutions of American extremism.

So he doesn’t hate Jews, he just doesn’t mind people who do.

Basically he’s sober enough to talk to the media while Earl drowns himself in bottles of self-hatred along with hating everything else.